click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
trading mission was formally approved by eu foreign ministers in brussels -- european union training mission was formally approved. >> citizens are worried involvement could be a long, drawn-out affair like in afghanistan. the point has to be approved by the bundestag later this week. >> french and malian forces engaged in a gunbattle. under a new proposal, german troops would not join them on the front line, but they would provide more logistical support, like using airbus jets to refuel french warplanes mid-air. an additional 150 troops will be needed for this task. several military planes are already being used to transport soldiers. >> we europeans have a strong interest in making sure that a safe haven for global terrorism is not allowed to develop on our doorstep. >> the german cabinet also wants to help train and assess the performance of the malian army. german soldiers will work together with units from other eu countries. >> the army needs to be trained from scratch so they can take over security themselves. we hope this is feasible, but it is a difficult and long-term chal
to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
on the show -- after grueling marathon negotiations, the eu agrees on a budget bill that for the first time sees a cut in spending. >> street battles in tunisia following the funeral of the slain opposition leader chokri belaid. >> millions are in asia heading home to celebrate the year of the snake. for the first time in the history of the european union, the long-term budget will be cut. 27 eu leaders meeting in brussels have agreed to a final budget during a second summit arranged especially to do so. we will go live to brussels for the latest in just a moment. >> that's right -- the drastically reduced seven-year budget is worth 959 billion euros and was hammered out after two days of nearly round-the- clock negotiations and is far less than the just over $1 trillion euros -- and the one trillion euros the commission had originally proposed. >> german chancellor angela merkel went into the talks saying she was confident the agreement would be reached. in the end, the 27 member states came up with a compromise that even british prime minister david cameron welcomed as a good deal for bri
a goal for the european union. after years of very little progress, the e appears to -- the eu appears to have an ally in what has. >> president obama announced the start of trade negotiations on a trade deal. brussels said talks could begin before summer. if successful, those negotiations would result in the biggest financial trade deal ever. >> the eu and u.s. already trade some 2 billion euros worth of goods and services every day. about 1/3 of total global commerce. president obama wants to bring that commerce into what would be the world's biggest free trade zone. the european commission says that would have world wide applications. >> which translates into tens of billions of euros every year and tens of thousands of new jobs. this offers us a great perspective at a time when we are gradually making our way to recovery. most important of all, it is a boost to our economies that does not cost 1 cent of taxpayer money. >> both sides stand to benefit. economists to warn that negotiations will be tough. the eu and washington disagree on issues ranging from industrial trade barriers a
'm kelly evans. these are your headlines from around the world. >> eu leaders are nearing a historical deal in brussels which could see the region's spending reduced for the first time. >>> chinese trade going gang bust ner january while inflationary pressures ease off thanks in part to the lunar new year effect. >>> this company must not disappear. that's the french government. it says it may invest in peugeot. >> and the yen says the currency has weakened too much. >>> welcome to the final program of the week. i'm pleased we've got to this day. >> we've had a lot of time together this week. i have. and that's not why i'm pleased we got to this day. >> yeah, yeah. >> strong numbers out of china. >> that's right. we saw a big improvement there. but i have to say frankly, most people's attention whether it's here or on the other side of the pond is the snowstorm. it seems like winds, 50 miles per hour. blizzard conditions in the u.s. we know when there's a storm like that headed for the biggest media market frankly in the world, it's probably all you're going to hear about for a while. >> th
at the new eu agreement to cap bonuses. it is aimed at a re-piece of the financial crisis. >> those in favor say it will address public anger about the role played by the banks and the economic meltdown. those against it, notably britain's -- britons, say that it will drive talent out of europe. >> the talks took more than 10 months. negotiators managed to clinch the deal despite opposition from the uk. at present, bankers can receive bonuses of as much as 20 times their basic salary. under the new rules, which can come into effect next year, they could be -- capped at one year's salary. >> most important thing is that banks will be stabilized, that a are better able to withstand the crisis -- that they are better able to withstand the crisis. >> it shows we are implementing what we learned from the financial crisis. >> critics say bonuses can encourage bankers to take unjustifiable risks in order to make more money. some say such behavior caused the financial and banking crisis. from now on, banks will also have to hold more capital as a buffer against any future crisis, a move intended to
year. >>> and the eu moves to clamp down on big paychecks in the banking sector, looking to cap bonuses on a banker's salary as early as next year. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. we're back. you're mobiled up and we have some data. >> yes. it's such a mobile world, isn't it, in many ways. let's first talk about what's happening with the german unemployment figures. we were waiting on these. it turns out 6.9%, that is the unemployment level for germany in january. the unadjusted figure is 7.4%. it's higher than expected. you can see the forecast was for 6.8%. the prior month was revised higher. the rate itself was unchanged. that's a right i think here in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contr
for italy's election. we'll get a check on europe's growth process spengts for the eu forecast. we'll head live to brussels for a live press conference. in other news, boeing is set to unveil a plan to help its troubled dreamliner to take flight today. and we're rolling out the red carpet. we'll head to tinsel town to the biggest night in hollywood. find out which films are tipped to win big at this year's oscars. fears are mounting that an inconclusive election this weekend could undermine the euro and set back markets in italy. hans, as we edge closer to that event, polls open sunday and they close on monday. we've seen the two-day sell off. is it related to the outcome here? >> well, i think the italian election has had an impact on market performance for the past few weeks. i guess that markets became much more cautious in investing in the debt market in italy and maybe as well as the debt market in spain, the cause of the potential inflation risk here. now, if we are getting an election result which markets may like, then the very clear majority left and under those circumstances, you
the prospect of having to bail out failed banks and eu governments for perhaps years to come. they are still asking why no charges have been brought in the interest rate fixing scandal among top level banks. >> now, the german finance minister is set to present proposals to address that anger that will include a tightening of banking regulations. germany is not the only european country planning new laws against the reckless bankers that cost taxpayers billions. >> and number of european governments are drawing up new measures to prevent big banks from passing on the costs of high risk trading to taxpayers. in germany, a new draft law is due to be presented to the cabinet on wednesday. the proposed law would require major banks to separate their retail and investment banking. it also outlines plans for restructuring and liquidation in the event of a crisis, and bank executives are engaged -- who engage in reckless behavior could face up to five years in prison, and britain is also bound to pressure to rein in the excesses' of the system in the wake of the libor scandal and breaches of money
the finger at another food-processing plant -- the go- ahead for the eu-wide dna testing. >> our inquiry shows they knew the meat labeled as beef could be horse meat -- at least they had a strong suspicion. >> horse meat in itself is as -- is not dangerous, and europe has clear rules on the food chain. of birth, the owner decides if an animal will end up on the dinner plate. it is all documented, including any medication administered. the revelation that horses were in millions of ready-to-eat meals has not just prompted moral objections. it has also raised fears of contamination through drugs. the scandal has also put the spotlight on the complex supply chains that bring food to europe's dinner tables. the scandal suggests they are hard to police and easy to manipulate. national authorities in the european union need to act fast to reassure consumers about what is in the food they eat. that is the call from a growing number of politicians, from britain to germany. >> this is not just about speed. we have to get quicker, but we also have to get better. that is why we need a rapid respons
registrations across the eu slumped to an all-time low in january. >>> government delays its decision on the next bank of japan governor. is this the beginning of a more moderate japanese agenda? >>> and we're live in milan as the italian electoral race enters the final stref. we'll hear just why the mayor will decide to vote. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> all right. welcome to today's, a bit of a transport theme going on this morning. >> or lack thereof. >> well, there's bmw, has their recalled. you have to take your one and three series back. >> the thing about the bmw is people have to take them to the special bmw shop, anyway. when you have a recall like this, it's a pretty straightforward process for owners. >> then making a replica of the "titanic." some people are worried they're making it in a chinese shipyard. >> they're pitching this with "titanic" with a twist. some say the twist should be maybe this time it won't sink. >> they are going to do the original sailing route. what happens when they get th
. we have the eu rising starts, the outstanding british film. but in the major categories, clearly people do look to the bafta the way same they would look to the gloelden gloep globes to see how things were going. "argo" is seen by everybody as a pack leader. there is a strange absence there on best director. whoever wins best director will be remembered as having won in the year that the most significant contender wasn't nominated. >> why isn't he nominated? >> who knows. who knows. i think we got it right, but who knows why he wasn't. one reason is because what they've done with the oscars now is increased the best film from five up to ten. now you have i think it's nine nominations this year. of course you're going to get a mismatch because there aren't the same number of films that there were directed. >> mark, good to see you. thanks so much, indeed. >> thanks for coming by. >> always a very good turn out, as well. >> i still think silver linings with a different name would have done so well. >>> anyway, the clearing up is occurring after nemo. what impact will this have on r
that perhaps is even more fundamentally dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than taming the e.u.'s superstate tendencies. this is the problem of attitudes and how the institutional expression in the economy. because as i illustrate in "becoming europe" the prevailing conviction across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. that such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics doesn't apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders including i have to say a considerable number of the center-right european politicians. so in this regard i have often wondered what -- would think if he read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it's about the new world, democracy in america was sent written for an american audience. alexis de tocqueville's intended audience was europe. so i think you would be astonished to learn how the americans observed by de tocqueville dealt with p
the uncertainty created by the u.k. e.u. referendum and scottish referendum on independence. there's a lot of negatives surrounding sterling now. i think it has further to fall. >> we'll leave it. there we want to get your thoughts on employment, as well. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." let's go straight to a look at what's happening with sterling. we have seen it drop below the 154 level. bank offen land minutes just -- of england minutes just showing fisher and miles would have liked to see a 25 billion pound increase in the size of the quantitative easing program. also comes as we learn that the u.k. unemployment rate held at 7.8%. slightly better than expected drop in jobless claims. average earnings growth remains weak. here's what's happening across the gilt curve. yields coming in at 2.4%. and james, at least the gilt yield is coming in. i suppose the markets would be most worried if the opposite happened, if it were to push out here. it's interesting to hear the bank of england say they think pound appreciation is expansionary. perhaps they look at th
dangerous for britain and much of the rest of the euro in the eu superstate tendencies. and this is a problem of values, attitudes, and how these are given in institutional expression in the economy. as i illustrate in becoming europe, the prevailing conviction across most of your is that the state is the primary way in which we address : problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics and that does not apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders, including, i have to say, a considerable numbers of center-right european politicians so in this regard have often wondered what a confirmed man would think if you read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it is about the new world, democracy in america was not written for an american audience. the intended audience was your. i suspect he would be astonished to learn how the americans built with problems that were beyond an individual's capaci
job opportunities for -- and the eu commission is already discussing this i think this is something that has to be added, and that, i hope, will also increase the understanding of the population of these countries. >> what do you think about what the bank of japan is doing right now with its policies, really pressuring the yen, that adds pressure, in turn, to the euro, which has pushed higher, versus the yen on these things, the u.s. watches that very closely. what do you think of their policy? >> yes, of course, we do watch it. but i think it's much overblown to speak of the currency war, something like that. what we observe is that the japanese central bank, the japanese government, wants to avoid the deflationary development, which i think makes a lot of sense. so i'm not too much concerned about that. >> so it's not a beggar thy neighbor policy at this point with the central banks around the globe? >> no. if it really leads to higher growth, that is the intention to have, then it's not beggar thy neighbor, then it's something that is helpful for all of us. and with regard to the
, but not much more than that. the eu is providing non-legal aid, i am wondering if the u.s. is considering this? and if you are ceding influence for the ron. afghanistan has asked u.s. troops to leave the province and i think within two weeks, can we get your comment on that? >> with respect to afghanistan, i understand the concerns they have expressed. appropriately, when a complaint they may have thought to be appropriately evaluated. they will be, i assure you. i have taken appropriate note and i have had a great deal of involvement in afghanistan with president karzai. there are evaluations of how things might have gone wrong or might have changed. we are working on a bilateral security arrangement and this transition process. we have had a very good conversation with the president. president obama talked to him before making announcements. we have listened very carefully to his observations about wanting to speed up the transition with respect to management of security. i can assure you that we are finely attuned to the needs of the afghan people, and the most effective ways to make this t
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)